Sans Forgetica — A Typeface that aids information retention

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A multidisciplinary team of designers and researchers from RMIT’s School of Design and its Behavioural Business Lab have designed a font using the principles of cognitive psychology to help students (and learners) better remember study notes.

With years of experience in eLearning methodologies, Chris @ Vyxl has a fascination with ensuring learners – and casual readers alike – retain as much information as possible from the sources we design and present to them.

And there are many tools and tricks: from clean and simple UI; quizlets within learning content to the often-forgotten plain language. 

Typography also plays a significant part to play in content presentation and information absorption, and the results of RMIT’s studies are a fascinating reminder that we can always strive for improvement.

When a piece of information is too easily and cleanly read, it can fail to engage our brains in the kind of deeper cognitive processing necessary for effective retention and recall.

Sans Forgetica is an attempt to address this somewhat ironic flaw of design. By disrupting the flow of individual letterforms, readers are subtly prompted to increase their focus on the text being communicated.

sf2Read more, and get the free Typeface (which includes a PDF story about the project with the download) at Massachusetts Institute of Technology — Sans Forgetica

There’s also a Chrome extension too!

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Will that be One Space or Two?

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At Vyxl, well-chosen fonts need to perform and behave beyond design appeal and basic readability and that’s where we move into deeper areas of Typography (leading, kerning, tracking and layout design) as well as beyond into good copywriting.

Take a read of this superb Washington Post article and see if you feel strongly about either argument discussed.

It may be a nuanced subject (well, sure, it is) but for any content consumption, clearly messaged advertising, Brand acumen, solid UX or to help achieve plain language, the devil is in the details.

2 spaces?  I’m in!

The Washington Post